The Bronx Candy Store
Veterans and Police
Tribute
For Service To Our Country
Sergeant Leonard J. Vivolo
U.S. Marine Corps
Viet Nam 
Service From 1963-1967
PFC Steven M Miller
U.S. Marine Corps
Killed On Active Duty 1981 Age 19
Camp Pendleton, California
(Mickey's Brother)
Lenny Vivolo
Marine Detachment 3rd Shore Party Battalion
3rd Marine Division....Viet Nam
On Board U.S.S. Tortuga 1964
Petty Officer 1st Class Michael McWatt
U.S. Navy Service From 1970-1990
WE
SUPPORT
OUR TROOPS
A SOLDIER PRAYS

Oh Lord!
Here we sit on this foreign soil,
So very far from home and loved one all.
Death so very near and we so very much afraid.

Please help my comrades and I,
For we wish not to die alone.
We pray that you will be here,
To hear our cry and us to your breast to take.

You are the only living Lord,
We give ourselves to you.
If we must die, and die we must,
Please take us home on high with you.

With outstretched hands we grasp for thee,
Thy love so tender and yet so strong.
Every breath of ours is yours to have,
We need you, Oh so very much Lord.


Written from the heart by Tom R. Milne 

IN MEMORY OF DEPARTED COMRADES

Do not stand at my grave and weep;
I am not there. I do not sleep.

I am a thousand winds that blow;
I am the diamond glints on snow.
I am the sunlight on ripened grain;

I am the gentle autumn's rain.
When you awaken in the morning's hush,

I am the swift uplifting rush
Of quiet birds in circled flight.

I am the soft star that shines at night.
Do not stand at my grave and cry.

I am not there; I did not die in vain as
long as my sacrifice is not forgotten.

(Author Unknown)
 
 

I Saw An Old Veteran

Beside the road
he sat
with an overgrown beard
and a strange looking
hat.
The sign he held, 
well, you know what it
said.
"Will work for food",
it read!
And beside him sat a
tired-looking
dog.
The dog was jet black
with forlorn
eyes.
But you could tell that
he was in
partnership with
the old vet,
as both sat under the
canopy of darkened
skies.
All of his earthly goods
were confined to
one duffel
bag.
Tied to his dog's wounded
leg was a bloody
dirty
rag!
Of course I stopped 
beside the
road
to talk a bit with him
and to learn that he
carried a
heavier load
within.
Both the vet and his
dog were
on the friendly
side
as they sat awaiting
a ride
to somewhere
down the
road,
either East or West
North or
South,
it made no difference
as long as they
had food for
the
mouth.
Where were you in the
war,
I said?
It was in Nam
as a tunnel
rat,
as he unconsciously
raised his
hat.
I could see from his
sunken eyes that 
I needed to
change
the topic,
for in Nam their hot
tropic
and underground
tunnels
could rob one of his
mind,
leaving a tunnel rat
blind
to the reality of
his surroundings.
He told me that he needed
a drink...
and I knew it was not
water
for his bottle was
full.
Now, let me ask you this
dear reader;
what would you do for
this Nam vet and his
best friend,
a tired old black dog
which tagged
along?
If you had been a tunnel
rat
in Nam would you be
a friend
to alcohol,
no matter the
brand?
Before you answer that
hard question
take another look at this
unkempt pair,
for crawling through
a jungle
underground, one longs for
fresh air
from the outside world
where claustrophobia
does not hem
one in.
Would you be a friend to
Old Granddad
or to
cheap wine of any
kind?
Would you "take this pair
In?"
Give the old black dog
a bath, rub him
down
dry him off
feed him with a bowl
of "Kibbles & Bits",
and give him a name
that fits!
And what would you do
with the Nam
vet,
who hasn't died 
yet?
Perhaps take him to the
VA
where he could stay
without
pay,
for there the health providers
could care for him,
clean him up, find him some clothes,
feed him well, tend to
his health,
and whatever else
only God
knows!
Then you could bring his dog
to the VA grounds
where the two
could meet
again
as they make the rounds.
Now, we both know that the scene
outlined above
will never come to 
pass,
for old vets and old dogs
are an unseemly 
sight,
so let them be free to
wander both day
and night.
You may find them sharing
a cardboard
box
under some unknown
bridge,
but still keeping the sign
which says
"Will work for food!"
So I shall feed them today
and send them on their 
way
down the road of
tomorrow,
where you can find the two
beside the road
of "Sorrow!"
My heart breaks for an old vet,
though the war be o'er,
he isn't home
yet!
I am an old vet too,
not of Nam
but WWII,
but I have a dog named
Muggs,
who welcomes all my 
hugs.
We both do not work
for food,
but have a nice warm
home
where we don't have to
roam
down some strange road
of
Tomorrow!
Better to have PTSD
for sixty years
than to have crawled through
those awful 
tunnels, in a jungle called
Nam 
and to have an only friend,
a black dog named
Sam!

C. Douglas Caffey
58th Wing of
the 509th
Air Photo Unit,
Army Air Corps.


I AM A COP

I took a job working around the clock, leaving my family alone at night while I stood out in rotten, miserable weather in order to protect your family. 

I worked two jobs in order to supplement a lousy salary so that I could make sure that you were able to get to your air conditioned home to your air conditioned car to your air conditioned office while I stood on a street corner, breathing exhaust fumes and directing traffic so you wouldn't be late.

While you were home with your kids on their Birthdays, Christmas, Easter and other momentous times in their lives I was responding on Robberies, Burglaries and Shots Fired calls and running down darkened alleys and across roof tops in parts of the city that you wouldn't consider going near. 

I missed a lot of birthdays, school plays, father and daughter dances because a dignitary or a celebrity came to town and you needed cops on the street to make sure that you could safely park without being annoyed by beggars and other lowlifes.

You were able to take your kids to the Thanksgiving Day Parade and have a wonderful, safe time. My kids were only able to watch it on TV because I had to leave the house before daybreak, set up barriers, keep thousands of excited little kids from running out into the street, or find the little lost kids (the ones that you "took your eyes off only for a second") calm their hysteria and help reunite them with their parents. By the time the parade was over, I was finally able to go home to my kids, tired but grateful that I wasn't working a 4 x 12 shift.

I did these, and thousands of other demanding and stressful jobs that you wouldn't think of doing in a thousand years.

I did them because I AM A COP. I found a profession that I was proud of and where I could serve my community and fellow man. It doesn't pay what it should, I am shunned and ostracized by people who don't think it is a job for anyone with intelligence (many Police Officers are college graduates and many have advanced degrees) and the press never tires at taking swipes at cops.

But, I belong the best brotherhood in the world. People that I trust with my life every day and that I know have my back every minute. We have our differences, like people of every race, creed, color, national origin and ethnicity, but when a "10-13" crackles over the air, I know in my heart that every officer out there will drop everything that they are doing and rush to my aid, regardless of our differences. 

Would anything like that ever happen on Wall Street? 

I am a cop in my soul and will be until the day I die.

Richard R. Vivolo
U.S. Army
Fort Dix, New Jersey
Service From 1960-1962
JIMMY FLYNN RIGHT OUT OF POLICE ACADEMY IN 1961, AND FIRST DAY READY TO REPORT TO 42PCT MY FIRST COMMAND.

PICTURE WAS TAKEN ON ROOF OF OUR RESIDENCE 1974 LAFONTAINE AVE.IN
THE 48TH PCT.
 
TWO YEARS LATER WAS IN A SHOOTING WITH 6 PERPS WITH WHO JUST ROBBED JEANNIES BROTHER SONNY COMING HOME FROM WORK AS A WAITER AT THE CROTONA PIZZERIA.

A NUMBER OF SHOTS WERE FIRED.
I WOUND UP ARRESTING ONE THAT NIGHT AND ARRESTING THE REST A FEW DAYS LATER.

P.S. I ONLY HAD MY OFF DUTY GUN WHICH HELD ONLY 5 SHOTS. WITH THE BAD GUYS WITH PLENTY OF AMMO.
 
I RECEIVED A POLICE COMMENDATION FOR THIS. 
 
 

Click here to add text.
PFC JIMMY FLYNN BEHIND WHEEL, PANAMA 1956  .50 CAL. MACHINE GUN MOUNTED ON JEEP.
THIS IS A GUY I ARRESTED WITH A KID HE KIDNAPPED IN MINNESOTA..
I ARRESTED HIM WITH A GUN IN HIS BOOT IN CENTRAL PARK.
HE HAD THE YOUNG KID WITH HIM.

Herb's Son Michael
Corporal, U.S.M.C.
Parris Island
Camp LeJeune
I WAS THE LEAD DETECTIVE  WHEN WE SEIZED THE .50 CAL MACHINE GUN, FROM WOMEN IN THE BLACK LIBERATION ARMY
Lou Volunteers For Beaverton P.D.
Preacher Mike In Viet Nam
Service 1966-1968
Preacher Mike In Viet Nam
Service 1966-1968
Preacher Mike In Viet Nam
1966-1968
1st Sergeant Mike Hynes  Re-Enlists Six More Years In 1975
Joan Csoka's Husband Al
U.S. Marine Corps
Picture Taken In
Chu Lai, Viet Nam in April 1966. They were waiting for helicopters to go on a search and destroy operation. 


Louis Tepe
Todd Shipyard Worker
Francis Colleton
Fran's Uncle
James Colleton
Fran's Father
Harold Tepe
Son Of Louis Tepe
Fran's Uncle
Army Air Corps
Barry Berger
(Center)
Specialist 4th Class
U.S. Army
1964-1966
Wildflecken, Germany
John Miller
U.S. Army  WWII
(Mickey's Dad)
Peter Ferraro
U.S. Navy  WWII
(Lenny's Uncle)
THE MIGHTIEST MILITARY IN THE WORLD
USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76)  (foreground), USS Kitty Hawk (CV 63) (middle), USS Abraham Lincoln  (CVN 72) and their associated carrier strike Groups steam in formation  while 17 aircraft from the Air Force, Navy, and Marine Corps fly over  them During a joint photo exercise (PHOTOEX) while preparing for  exercise Valiant Shield 2006. 

The Kitty Hawk Carrier Strike Group  is currently participating in Valiant Shield 2006, the largest joint  Exercise in recent history. Held in the Guam operating area June  19-23, the exercise includes 28 Naval vessels including three carrier  strike groups. Nearly 300 aircraft and approximately 22,000 service  members from the Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard are  also participating in the exercise. Official U.S. Navy photo by Chief  Photographer's Mate Todd P. 


USS Milwaukee (AOR-2)
Radioman 3rd Class Michael McWatt
1970-74

Sign InView Entries
The Blue Angels
U.S. Navy Seaman Peter Santini
Son Of Richard & Eleanor Santini
Receiving Post 911 Citation Commendation
From Assistant Secretary Of Defense
Victoria Clarke

Richie Santini Is From 178th St & Bathgate Ave.
Bronx, New York

During the WW I years, Arthur S. Mole and John D. Thomas made some 
incredible human pictures by using thousands of sailors or soldiers in 
uniform to create images . It took 18,000 soldiers to make up this picture of the Statue Of Liberty.

Submitted by Richard Santini

Richard Santini's Son-In-Law Angel (2nd from left) with buddies. U.S.Army
U.S. Army Abram's Tank
Listen To Your Favorite Military Song
Click The Links Below
Then Click Your Back Arrow To Return To Veterans Page
With a year to go before it even touches the water, the Navy's amphibious
assault ship USS New York has already made history. It was built with 24
tons of scrap steel from the World Trade Center.

USS New York is about 45 percent complete and should be ready for launch 
in mid-2007. Katrina disrupted construction when it pounded the Gulf 
Coast last summer, but the 684-foot vessel escaped serious damage, and 
workers were back at the yard near New Orleans two weeks after the storm.

It is the fifth in a new class of warship - designed for missions that
include special operations against terrorists. It will carry a crew of 
360 sailors and 700 combat-ready Marines to be delivered ashore by 
helicopters and assault craft.

"It would be fitting if the first mission this ship would go on is to 
make sure that bin Laden is taken out, his terrorist organization is 
taken out," said Glenn Clement, a paint foreman. "He came in through the 
back door and knocked our towers down and (the New York) is coming right 
through the front door, and we want them to know that."

Steel from the World Trade Center was melted down in a foundry in Amite,
LA to cast the ship's bow section. When it was poured into the molds on
Sept. 9, 2003, "those big rough steelworkers treated it with total 
reverence," recalled Navy Capt. Kevin Wensing, who was there. "It was a 
spiritual moment for everybody there."

Junior Chavers, foundry operations manager, said that when the 
tradecenter steel first arrived, he touched it with his hand and the 
"hair on my neck stood up." "It had a big meaning to it for all of us," 
he said. "They knocked us down. They can't keep us down. We're going to 
be back."

The ship's motto? - 'Never Forget'

About The U.S.S New York
U.S.S. New York
This page was last updated: November 10, 2015
email me
Wheezie's Uncle's Brother
Charles Colleton
U.S. Navy
Fran's Uncle
Joe In Marine Uniform & Fran
Wedding Day
Ray Moore
U.S. Army...WWII
Fran & Helen's Uncle
Richie Moore
Seabees WWII
Fran & Helen's Uncle
Eugene Lorenz WWII
(Mickey's Uncle)
Veterans Memorial Park
Safety Harbor, Florida
Veterans Memorial Park
Munster, Indiana
"Blessed Are The Peacemakers"
Rest Easy Soldiers!
If anyone would like to include a picture of their hometown Veterans Memorial, please e-mail me the picture and I will be happy to include it on this memorial page.
lennyv@tampabay.rr.com
Notice
Veterans Memorial
Millstone, New Jersey
Tony Mazzeo
Tony Mazzeo
Veterans Memorial
Farmingville, Long Island
Veterans Memorial
Farmingville, Long Island
A Childhood Friend  Joey Reale